News


Supporters erect Washington DC billboard ahead of pending trial announcement

January 9, 2012. Bradley Manning Support Network. Supporters of PFC Bradley Manning have erected a billboard in Washington, DC as the accused WikiLeaks whistle-blower awaits an announcement about the military’s plans for his trial at nearby Fort Meade, Maryland. The billboard, which reads, “Free Bradley Manning: Blowing the whistle on war crimes is not a crime” is located on the route to downtown Washington from Fort Meade.

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“History will ultimately judge my client,” declares Bradley Manning’s attorney

January 6, 2012. Kevin Gosztola of FDL. While the prosecution accused Bradley of aiding Al Qaeda, Bradley’s attorney David Coombs struck back with a strongly political defense. “[A] hallmark of our democracy is the ability of our government to be open with its public,” Coombs stated. “History will ultimately judge my client.”

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Update 1/5/12: Photos of Bradley, supporters, and courtroom sketches, from Ft Meade

Collections of images from Fort Meade during Bradley’s Article 32 pre-trial hearing.

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The scale of American overclassification

January 5, 2011. Nathan Fuller. PFC Bradley Manning’s defense attorney said that the information released is all out in the public, and yet it hasn’t caused any harm. “If anything, it’s helped.” This is because most of the documents WikiLeaks released should not have been classified in the first place. In his closing words, Coombs implored the military to “give the government a reality check,” and to live up to its own professed standards of openness and accountability.

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Update 12/30/11: A message from Bradley and his family; ‘Intellectual cowardice of critics’

“I want you to know how much Bradley and his family appreciate the continuing support of so many, especially during the recent Article 32 hearing.” Glenn Greenwald addresses “The intellectual cowardice of Bradley Manning’s critics”

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No harm in transparency: Wrap-up from the Bradley Manning pretrial hearing

December 25, 2011. Bradley Manning Support Network. On Friday December 16, the world turned its eyes to a small courtroom in Fort Meade, MD, where Bradley Manning made his first public appearance after 18 months in pretrial confinement. The pretrial hearing – known as the Article 32 hearing – is normally a quick hearing shortly after one is arrested to determine whether and what kind of court martial is appropriate.

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Final day of Bradley Manning’s pre-trial hearing: In depth notes from the art. 32 courtroom

December 24, 2011. The Bradley Manning Support Network sent a representative into the courtroom to take notes for the public on what happened at Bradley Manning’s hearing. No recording devices (like cell phones or audio recorders) were allowed, so all these notes are hand-written and as accurate as written notes and memory allow. Notes were taken by Nathan L. Fuller. Please send corrections to [email protected] Here are the defense and prosecution’s closing arguments!

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Update 12/21/11: Preliminary media roundup of Bradley Manning’s pretrial hearing

Bradley Manning has been in court since last Friday. Hundreds of supporters participated both by attending the rally outside the gates of Fort Meade, and acting as citizen journalists inside the courtroom. DemocracyNow!, The Daily Beast, Lt. Dan Choi and more weigh in on the event…

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Day 6 of Bradley Manning’s pre-trial hearing: In-depth notes from the Art. 32 courtroom

December 20, 2011. Bradley Manning Support Network. Day six of our in depth notes from the courtroom series. Proceedings began at 9am sharp with David Coombs calling Sgt. Daniel Padgett to the stand.

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Day 5 of Bradley Manning’s pre-trial hearing: In-depth notes from the Art. 32 courtroom

December 20, 2011: Bradley Manning Support Network sent a representative into the courtroom to take notes for the public on what happened at Bradley Manning’s hearing. No recording devices (like cell phones or audio recorders) were allowed, so all these notes are hand-written and as accurate as written notes and memory allow. We were allowed into the courtroom at 9:12 AM.

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